Running for office isn’t cheap, and candidates will always need to raise money for their campaigns---from voters, unions, business groups and everybody else who wants to put their money where their mouths are. It’s the American way, buttressed by the Supreme Court, which has struck down spending limits in recent years. But we strongly believe that campaign spending should be transparent, with strict disclosure requirements and clear guidelines for candidates as to how they raise campaign funds.

Important Resources:

The Committee of Seventy applauds the initiative taken by the Philadelphia Board of Ethics and City Council to improve the city’s campaign finance ordinance and urges this Committee to vote in favor of Bill 150368. Read More...
With the 2015 municipal elections already underway, Seventy commends the Ethics Board for proposing amendments to its regulation interpreting the city’s campaign finance law.  Read More...
Changing the channel won't save you. Candidate campaigns and third party groups are spending millions on TV ad time - all to win your vote. But where's the money coming from? Who's buying the ads? This HOW PHILLY WORKS gives you the scoop. Read More...
Seventy expressed relief that a U.S. Supreme Court ruling issued today does not impact caps on contributions to most candidates elected by Philadelphia voters. Read More...
The Pennsylvania gubernatorial race is heating up, and candidates will be asking for money. The issue is statewide. So Seventy is debuting this How PA Works to explain the rules - or, lack thereof - when it comes to your checkbook and campaign war chests.  Read More...